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    The Building They Shaped – The Hatfield Courthouse at Twenty

    By Doug Pahl Winston Churchill once observed, “We shape our buildings, and afterward our buildings shape us.”  Twenty years ago, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Chief Judge Proctor Hug stood in the gleaming green lobby of the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse and reminded us of Churchill’s wisdom.  It was November 13, 1997, and an unprecedented group of dignitaries gathered to celebrate and dedicate Portland’s first new courthouse since 1933. Judges, court staff, administration officials, designers, and artists, all led by Judge Malcolm F. Marsh, had indeed shaped an impressive building with great care, intention, and respect.  As the Hatfield Courthouse completes its teen years, it is timely to reflect…

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    When is a Postmaster Like the Man in the Moon? The Tumultuous Presidential Election of 1876

    by Stephen Raher The presidential election of 1876 was a contentious battle over the future of the post-Civil War United States.  Students of history will recall that Louisiana, Florida, and South Carolina each submitted dueling vote tallies after the election, thus requiring Congressional action to decide the disputed results in those states.  Less well-remembered, however, was an electoral controversy in a fourth state: Oregon. Setting the Stage In the years leading up to November 1876, political observers knew the election to replace President Ulysses S. Grant would be hotly contested.  The policy of Reconstruction was under increasing attack, and while Republicans still controlled the Senate, anti-Reconstruction Democrats had regained a…