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    Moving Pictures: Digitizing Our Collection

      By Adair Law Since the 1980s the USDCHS has recorded various ceremonial (and often jovial) aspects of the life of the court for the District of Oregon. Our archives contain recordings made in a variety of different formats between the late 1980s to the present. Among the recordings are investitures, portrait unveilings, retirement parties, and memorial services. We are grateful to the courtroom technologists who made these recordings over the years, and especially to Houston Bolles, the videographer behind the camera for most of these particular recordings. With the financial support of the Attorney Admissions Fund, the vision of our president and board, and the wrangling/administrative skills of USDCHS…

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    U.S. Marshal Reginald Madsen: Behind the Scenes Yet Ever Present

      By Adair Law U.S. Marshal Reginald Madsen (1940-2021), who served the U.S. District Court in that capacity from 1994 to 2001, recently passed away in Island City, Oregon. Known by most as Reg, Mr. Madsen was born in Keshena, Wisconsin on the Menominee Indian Reservation. He served in the U.S. Navy, received a degree from Clark College in Vancouver, Washington, and later attended the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia. He began his career in law enforcement as a police officer in the Vancouver Police Department. He went on to serve the Oregon State Police. He capped off the last three years of his service (1968-93) there as superintendent. After…

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    Your Case is Set for Trial… by Zoom!

      By Joseph Carlisle In January 2021, I tried an arbitration case by Zoom.  While the five-day arbitration hearing went smoothly, with only a few hiccups, it required an extra amount of planning, preparation, and coordination.  All litigators know that, as the trial date nears, time is in short supply.  When trying a case by video conference during the tenth month of the COVID-19 pandemic, coordinating such crucial but seemingly mundane things as the delivery of exhibit binders to various witnesses’ homes and attending test runs of the video conference platform itself eats into preparation time.  It requires an extra layer of quality control to make sure all your exhibit…

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    Honoring U.S. District Judge James Milton Burns

      By Hon. Stacie F. Beckerman Visitors to the Hatfield Courthouse may now view a historical display honoring the late U.S. District Judge James Milton Burns. The U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society and the Federal Bar Association (FBA), with funding from the Attorney Admissions Fund and in cooperation with Judge Burns’ family, have placed in the Jury Assembly Room a reproduction of Judge Burns’ portrait (the original of which hangs in Courtroom 14A), a short biography, and plaques honoring the annual recipients of the Judge James M. Burns Federal Practice Award since its inception in 2002. The display also includes Judge Burns’ judicial robe, first presented by the…

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    Pandemic Reflections: Looking Beyond Our Courtrooms

      By Hon. Stacie F. Beckerman, U.S. Magistrate Judge In December 2019, I informed a pregnant defendant (“G”) at her arraignment that I was detaining her pending trial. She fainted. The deputy U.S. Marshal called 911, and G was rushed to the hospital. She was treated and released, and at the continued hearing, I stood my ground. However, a few months later, her baby was born suffering from complications, and I released G from custody to nurse her daughter to health while housed in a structured program. Soon G had demonstrated that she was not going to run, and I allowed her to return home to her family, but with…