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    Malcolm F. Marsh: A Judicial Philosophy of Kindness–Lifetime Service Award 2020

      By Kelly A. Zusman The U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society is pleased to honor Judge Malcolm F. Marsh with its 2020 Lifetime Service Award. This article is based on his 2005 oral history and many conversations with Judge Marsh. He was the “baby” judge in 1987. It had been seven years since President Jimmy Carter had appointed the trio:  Judges Owen Panner, Helen J. Frye, and James A. Redden. Judge Robert Belloni and Jim Burns were the senior judges, and the district of Oregon had just three U.S. Magistrate Judges at that time:  William Dale, George Juba, and Michael Hogan. Judge Malcolm Marsh had been appointed just…

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    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020)

    We note with sadness and respect the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. We direct your attention to pages 3 and 7 of our Fall 2008 Oregon Benchmarks.  In September 2008, Oregon enjoyed visits from Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sandra Day O’Connor, and Anthony Kennedy.  

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    Justice Hans A. Linde (1924-2020)

    The USDCHS notes with sadness the passing of an Oregon legal giant, Oregon Supreme Court Justice Hans A. Linde.  We direct you to these articles for more information about his place in Oregon and national history. We are grateful to have a 2019 picnic memory captured. The picnic theme celebrated the men and women who have served on Oregon’s highest court. 2019 was the first year that women justices formed the majority of the Oregon Supreme Court. In a touching moment, to ensure a group photograph that included then-95-year-old Oregon Supreme Court Justice Hans Linde, the gathering of decades-spanning former and current Oregon Supreme Court justices moved with one accord…

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    President’s Message: Graffiti in the Time of Protests

    By Julie Engbloom, USDCHS President 2019, 2020 “The boisterous sea of liberty is never without a wave.” Thomas Jefferson The quote, etched in granite on the front of the Mark O. Hatfield Courthouse, comes from a letter Thomas Jefferson wrote to Lafayette in December 1820. The correspondence put forth Jefferson’s solution to slavery:  diffusion. Jefferson believed that the spread of slavery into the Louisiana Purchase territory would more quickly end the institution and result in emancipation. This idea led Jefferson to oppose the Tallmadge Amendment, which sought to admit Missouri to the Union as a free state. It is in this context Jefferson wrote: The boisterous sea of liberty indeed…

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    No Pandemic Drop Off in Work in the U.S. Attorney’s Office

    Most members of the U.S. Attorney’s Office are teleworking from home unless court or office business requires a personal presence in the office or a physical presence in court. Chief of the Civil Division Renata Gowie notes, “We haven’t really seen a drop off in work,” and that in some respects, the work has increased. “Now that we are about three months into the pandemic, a few plaintiffs are eager to conduct in-person depositions in civil defensive cases, which often requires travel to other parts of the state or out of state. Remote depositions pose their own challenges. There are technological limitations and connectivity issues, and one cannot appropriately determine…